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Is Bill Gates using microchip implants to fight the coronavirus?

by Grailing Anthonisen - July 27, 2020   1889 Views   4 min
Is Bill Gates using microchip implants to fight the coronavirus?

Claim

Bill Gates will use microchip implants to fight the coronavirus

Verdict

Inaccurate (no factual basis; unacceptable margin of error)

In March 2020, the website Biohackinfo claimed that Bill Gates would use microchip implants to fight the coronavirus. Biohackinfo’s claim is inaccurate and misleading.

How they constructed the misleading claim

Biohackinfo quoted an “Ask Me Anything” thread on Reddit, on which Gates answered a question about businesses operating with physical distancing. In the second part of his answer, Gates mentioned a future possibility of using “digital certificates to show who has recovered or been tested recently or when we have a vaccine, who has received it.”

The response does not mention microchip implants. Microchip implants and digital certificates are not the same thing, and microchip implants are not the same as quantum dots. Biohackinfo wrongfully equated different elements and falsely links them to a scientific study and a non-profit. This claim, by garnering thousands of likes and shares on social media platforms, has given rise to conspiracy theories claiming Gates is planning to use vaccines to track people and another that Gates is the Antichrist, to name just a few.

Microchip implants and digital certificates are not the same thing

A microchip is a unit of circuitry found in all electronic devices that links to other microchips in computer hardware. A microchip implant is encased in silicone and implanted under the skin to track or record medical or security details. It is typically the size of a grain of rice and usually has an identification number that can refer to information kept on an external database.

Gates’s comment refers to digital certificates which are electronic credentials, like an email address, card number or username, “that bind the identity of the certificate owner to a pair of electronic encryption keys”. Their main purpose is to ensure the identity of the sender and to provide the receiver with the ability to send back an encoded response. These are not the same as microchips or microchip implants because they are virtual, not physical.

Microchip implants are not the same as quantum dots

The Biohackinfo claim falsely links Gates’s comment with a study produced by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Rice University that examined possible solutions to poor medical-record keeping in low-income countries. The researchers developed microneedles, which are delivered with a vaccine and dissolve in the skin, leaving patterns of near-infrared light-emitting microparticles that can be read by a medical professional with a modified smartphone. The specific pattern creates an on-person record of that individual’s vaccination, making it easy to tell who has been vaccinated. But it is not a vaccine. Vaccines are intramuscular and depending on the vaccine, they are placed there to solicit an immune reaction. The study refers to it as “near-infrared quantum dots”. This is also not the same as microchip implants.

Additionally, this study has nothing to do with the coronavirus. It was submitted for publication on 20 July 2019, months before the coronavirus first emerged. The claim falsely links this Gates’s comment with this study, partly because MIT reported that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation was one of the funders of the research, along with the Koch Institute Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute.

The Biohackinfo website speculated about a link between the quantum dot tattoos and ID2020, an unrelated non-profit organization, saying the former “will likely be supplemented” by the latter. There is no link between this study and this organization. ID2020 does not work on microchip implants. Their organizational goal is to create a system where people have complete control over their own personal identification and health documents.

The infodemic and spotting disinformation

Biohackinfo’s claim is categorically inaccurate and builds itself by falsely equivocating different objects and projects that actually have nothing to do with each other. It is one of many claims emerging on the internet and garnering a great deal of likes and shares on social media despite its blatant inaccuracy. The World Health Organization (WHO) termed the recent excessive quantity of information, some accurate and others false or unverified, that makes it difficult to find reliable sources and information an “infodemic.” WHO has been releasing “mythbusters” to counter misinformation where possible and has launched an awareness campaign in partnership with the United Kingdom to address the risks of spreading false information about the pandemic.

The Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) released a fact sheet on how to understand the infodemic and the rise of misinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic. They explain that people look for information about the pandemic, often feeling stressed, anxious, depressed and/or overwhelmed, which affects their decision-making processes. They often look for immediate answers and a sense of relief, but do not have enough time to delve into and analyze the evidence. In these situations, it’s easier to fall prey to misinformation or disinformation – and spread it.

The PAHO recommends getting information from a reliable source, like the World Health Organization and if you cannot confirm the information’s source, usefulness or if it has been shared before, you shouldn’t share it. They also recommended questioning and confirming the source of information and determining if the information really makes sense, even if it has been shared before. As well, you should report rumours and disinformation when you see them.

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  Claim

Biohackinfo

Organization
Bill Gates will use microchip implants to fight the coronavirus

Verdict:

Inaccurate (no factual basis; unacceptable margin of error)

 July 27, 2020


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